Leading ERP software for growing manufacturers

Manufacturing Breakthrough

BLOG

The Thinking Processes Part 4

The Thinking Processes Part 4

By Bob Sproull

A Review

In my last post I described the first three steps in the creation of our Current Reality Tree as follows:

 

  1.     Define the system boundaries, goals, necessary conditions and performance measures.
  2.     State the System Problem.
  3.     Create a Causes, Negatives, and Why’s Table

 

We began step three by listing our negatives in our table, so let’s now move on with our example by completing our table. It’s important that you have a clear picture of how to construct a CRT, so we will take our time as we walk you through this process.  I might add that the technique I am using here is one that was developed by Bill Dettmer [1].

Creating a Causes, Negatives and Why’s Table

In my last post we listed our negatives or what we don’t like about the current situation.  In our table below, we have now listed the why’s to state why the negative is “bad” for our goal, necessary conditions or performance measurements.

 

Causes (What is causing this negative?

Negatives (What I don’t like about the current situation?)

Why is this negative bad for our goal, necessary condition or measurement?

 

  1. Absenteeism is high and unstable

1a. P & A is forced to overstaff operations which drives up operating expenses  

 

  1. Processes are not stable & predictable

2a. Wet cement and grout drive cycle times higher

 

  1. Operators don’t/won’t follow specifications

3a. Excessive rework causes higher operating expense

 

  1. Product build cycle times are excessively long

4a. Throughput rates are too low causing late deliveries to customers

 

  1. Equipment breaks down frequently

5a. Cycle times are extended causing late deliveries to customers

 

  1. Incoming materials are frequently non-conforming

6a. Product cycle times are extended causing late deliveries to customers

 

  1. QA inspections are inconsistent between inspectors

7a. Excess repairs drive up operating expenses and delay shipments

 

  1. Problems are never really solved

8a. Repetitive defects occur which result in excessive repair time which drives up

    Once the why column of the table has been completed, move to the “Cause” column and, for each negative, ask the following question, “What is causing this negative?” or “Why does this negative exist?” It’s important to remember that there could very well be more than one cause responsible for creating this negative and if there are, make sure you list them.  For each Cause, place an upper case letter beside the appropriate number, again, to distinguish between negatives, causes and whys. When this table is complete, you are now ready to construct your current reality tree. All of the Causes, Negatives and Whys will serve as your initial building blocks for your CRT. So here is our completed table.

     

    Causes (What is causing this negative?

    Negatives (What I don’t like about the current situation?)

    Why is this negative bad for our goal, necessary condition or measurement?

    A1.  Attendance policy is not enforced by HR and/or operations

    1. Absenteeism is high and unstable

    1a. P & A is forced to overstaff operations which drives up operating expenses

    A2. Effective process control system does not exist

    1. Processes are not stable & predictable

    2a. Wet cement and grout drive cycle times higher

    A3. Specifications are vague, not current and difficult to understand

    1. Operators don’t/won’t follow specifications

    3a. Excessive rework causes higher operating expense

    A4. Material dry/cure times are excessively long

    1. Product build cycle times are excessively long

    4a. Throughput rates are too low causing late deliveries to customers

    A5. Preventive maintenance on key equipment is inconsistent or ineffective

    1. Equipment breaks down frequently

    5a. Cycle times are extended causing late deliveries to customers

    A6. Suppliers are not always held accountable to produce in-spec material

    1. Incoming materials are frequently non-conforming

    6a. Product cycle times are extended causing late deliveries to customers

    A7. Clear and concise acceptance standards do not exist

    1. QA inspections are inconsistent between inspectors

    7a. Excess repairs drive up operating expenses and delay shipments

    A8. Most problem solving efforts focused on treating the symptoms instead of the root cause(s)

    1. Problems are never really solved

    8a. Repetitive defects occur which result in excessive repair time which drives up

       

      Next time

      Now that we have laid the foundation for the CRT, in my next post we’ll construct our example Current Reality Tree.  As always, if you have any questions or comments about any of my posts, leave me a message and I will respond. 

      Until next time.

      Bob Sproull

       

      References:

      [1] The Logical Thinking Process – H. William Dettmer, Quality Press, 2007

      Bob Sproull

      About the author

      Bob Sproull has helped businesses across the manufacturing spectrum improve their operations for more than 40 years.

      facebook-icon facebook-icon linkedin-icon linkedin-icon twitter-icon twitter-icon blog-icon blog-icon youtube-icon youtube-icon instagram-icon instagram-icon Bookmark this page Google +